WWII Dr. Seuss cartoon

Dr Seuss blk wht labor

Dr. Seuss was a true American treasure. As teachers we are very lucky that most students are familiar with his work, because it gives them a higher level of comfort when examining his political cartoons.

We have included this cartoon which is a commentary on segregation in war industries at the beginning of the war.

Here are questions and answers ready for your classroom use.

For more WWII resources check out our:

World History PowerPoints

US History PowerPoints

Classroom history games

Image Libraries

Film Library

Historic Film Collection, Part 3

Thanksgiving by Puck, 1903-1905

We collected 3 images from the years of 1903-1905 as a way of showing students the way the holiday was represented over 100 years ago.

We created questions and answers for your classroom.

For more teaching resources check out our Products page.

Appeasement cartoon by Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss was an American treasure for all of his amazing contributions throughout his prolific life.

His political cartoons during WWII provide a wonderful opportunity for students to analyze obvious images in order to decipher the messages.

We have included a copy of this cartoon along with questions and answers.

For more WWII resources check out our:

1940s Historic Film Collection

US History PowerPoints:

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Classroom History Classroom Games

Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

The controversial Fugitive Slave Act in 1850 was one of several compromises made during the tenuous antebellum period.

The cartoon we have chosen to highlight today works great for students as it requires them to analyze both the images and text in order to gain a deeper understanding of the artist’s position.

We have included a copy of the cartoon as well as questions and answers.

For more US History resources on this era check out our PowerPoints:

Classroom History games:

Cuban Missile Crisis political cartoon

This cartoon, drawn by Edmund Valtman and published in The Hartford Times, October 30, 1962, is a fantastic cartoon for classroom use.

The symbols used are easily recognizable and that makes students feel much more confident going into a cartoon interpretative assignment.

We have included a copy of the cartoon as well as questions and answers ready to use in your classroom.

For more Cold War resources check out our PowerPoints:

US History

World History

Classroom History Games:

Child Labor Political Cartoon Lesson

In honor of Labor Day weekend, we thought we’d post a lesson on child labor.

When designing a unit, it is important to determine the final product. We love to give students the choice of a political cartoon since it forces them to analyze symbols and dig deeper in order to fully represent the concepts at hand.

The cartoon we’ve included for today’s lesson is a prime example of expressing several deep concepts within one picture.

For more resources on child labor throughout US history, check out some of our PowerPoints:

Chinese immigration cartoon, 1879

Political cartoons are one of our favorite ways to teach high level concepts, as the symbolism tends to be rich with discussion points.

We have created questions and answers for this 1879 cartoon which comments on legislation that would have restricted the entrance of Chinese immigrants to 15 at a time.

For more resources on this era check out our PowerPoints:

Cold War cartoon on Iron Curtain

The Cold War is rich with symbols that help students truly understand the conflict. This cartoon is no exception.

Published in 1947 in the wake of Soviet involvement in Greece and Turkey, Jay “Ding” Darling captures the feelings of the hopelessness ahead in resolving issues with communist Russia.

We have included questions and answers for your classroom use.

For more Cold War resources check out our PowerPoints:

Classroom history games:

FDR cartoon “Sweeping Changes”, 1933

Incoming president Franklin D. Roosevelt took office at a troubled time in US history. Hoover had failed to fix the economic problems facing the nation.

This cartoon shows Uncle Sam and Hoover watching as Congress hands FDR a broom for making sweeping changes to the nation.

We have included a copy of the cartoon as well and questions and answers ready for your classroom use.

For more on this era check out our US History PowerPoint:

The Great Depression and the New Deal 

Classroom history games:

American Rattlesnake cartoon, 1782

This 1782 British cartoon reflects the belief by the cartoonist that continual fighting on the part of the British was futile.

We have created questions and answers for your classroom use.

For more resources on this era check out our PowerPoints:

Check out our classroom history games:

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