Teaching the American West

Annie Oakley, a dynamic woman who achieved and overcome much in her six decades, is a great figure to introduce to students when teaching a unit on Western History.

Often overlooked, western history is filled with countless stories that students would be excited to learn about.

For more resources please checkout our PowerPoints:

Westward Movement

The West: Miners, Ranchers, Farmers, and Native Americans

Our classroom history games:

American Rattlesnake cartoon, 1782

This 1782 British cartoon reflects the belief by the cartoonist that continual fighting on the part of the British was futile.

We have created questions and answers for your classroom use.

For more resources on this era check out our PowerPoints:

Check out our classroom history games:

Cumberland Gap

This 1986 film explores the significance of the Cumberland Gap to the movement of people for thousands of years, especially in Westward growth in what is now the United States.

For more about Western US History, check out our PowerPoints and Simulation Games:

French and Indian War: The Seven Years War in America

This 1962 Encyclopedia Britannica film covers the major events in North America in the mid-1700s that culminated in a war that forever changed the Western world.

Cleverly using paintings, the viewer is shown the important people, places, and figures as well as the differences between French and English colonial policies and ways of life. A detailed look at the Battle of Quebec is a highlight.

For more resources on this era check out our:

PowerPoints

Simulation Games

Major Causes of the American Revolution

This chart, from our Colonial Era and American Revolution PowerPoints, identifies the major causes of the American independence movement in the colonies.

We have included the chart along with questions and answers for your students.

Check out all our resources on this era:

PowerPoints

Simulation Games:

Image Library:

US History Image Library – Pre-20th Century


Benjamin Franklin’s Join or Die

Although this cartoon can be seen in almost every major US History textbook, we still think it’s worth analyzing with questions.

We have included a copy with questions and answers.

For more on this era please check out our resources:

US History PowerPoints

  • Colonization to Reconstruction:
    U.S. History Review
  • Colonial Era
  • The American Revolutionary War
  • Simulation Games

    Image Library

    US History Image Library – Pre-20th Century

    Common Sense by Thomas Paine, 1776

    One of the most influential documents written in the US during the struggles with Britain, this pamphlet offers an opportunity for students to read some of the arguments made for separation.

    We have included an excerpt with questions and answers.

    For more on this era check out our PowerPoints:

  • Colonization to Reconstruction:
    U.S. History Review
  • Colonial Era
  • The American Revolutionary War
  • First Industrial Revolution in America: 1790-1860
  • The New Nation: Washington to John Quincy Adams
  • Simulation games:

    Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty or Give me Death”, 1775

    We have included an excerpt along with questions and answers from his passionate speech given on the eve of the revolutionary war.

    It is short and well-suited for use as a primary source since the language is easily understandable.  This can help students feel good about reading a “real speech”.

    For more on this era check out our Colonial Era, Revolutionary War, and Early US History Review PowerPoints and our classroom ready simulation games:

    The French Revolution and A Tale of Two Cities

    Analyzing documents is an important part of any history curriculum. That is why our PowerPoints include lessons, often with historical speeches and letters.

    Our French Revolution PowerPoint contains an excerpt from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

    It helps students understand that reading literature is also part of being a historian since authors tend to editorialize stories with their own slant on current events.

    We have included a copy of an excerpt, questions, and answers.

    President Washington’s Farewell Address, 1796

    farewell addressPresident George Washington did not seek a third term, which set a precedent followed by presidents well into the 20th century.

    In his farewell speech, he addressed the course the new nation ought to pursue in the future, especially regarding foreign relations.

    It was published initially in 1796 in David Claypoole’s American Daily Advertiser and was republished for many years in newspapers and as a pamphlet and read by many Americans.

    We have included a transcript of the speech as well as questions and answers.

    For more information on this topic see our PowerPoint – The New Nation: Washington to John Quincy Adams.

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