1960s PSAs

On weekend mornings throughout the 1960s, public service announcements were part of regular programming. We found this gem which is a collection of warnings about protecting livestock during a nuclear attack. It is particularly amusing because of the use of marionette dolls.

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US History PowerPoints

Classroom History Games

Cold War Comic Books

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Every teacher strives to find new ways to pique and keep students’ interest throughout the school year.

We believe that comic books can be one of many resources in this quest.

In this case we are highlighting a few Esquire Comics from the Cold War era.

The imagery can be quite graphic at times, so prescreening is always essential before passing something out.

We have included an assignment that is classroom ready to be used during a Cold War unit.

For more Cold War resources check out our:

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Historic Film Collection

Historic Film Collection, Part 4

Peace Corps

President Kennedy created the Peace Corps with Executive Order 10924 in March 1961.

We have included a copy of the Order along with questions and answers.

For more on this era check out:

US History PowerPoints – 

1960s

US Foreign Policy in the Cold War Era: Truman to Kennedy

Classroom History games -

Cuban Missile Crisis political cartoon

This cartoon, drawn by Edmund Valtman and published in The Hartford Times, October 30, 1962, is a fantastic cartoon for classroom use.

The symbols used are easily recognizable and that makes students feel much more confident going into a cartoon interpretative assignment.

We have included a copy of the cartoon as well as questions and answers ready to use in your classroom.

For more Cold War resources check out our PowerPoints:

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1971 Agreement between the US and USSR to avoid nuclear war

Students feel empowered when they can read and understand primary source documents. Often they are written in language far above the ability of most middle and high schoolers and so some students give up.

This document, written in 1971 between two nations that were on the road to detente, provides an opportunity to have a little fun. It’s easy to read and can be translated into “teenage speak”.

We’ve included the Agreement, an assignment and answers for your classroom use.

For more Cold War Era resources check out our:

US History PowerPoints

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Classroom history games

Cold War cartoon on Iron Curtain

The Cold War is rich with symbols that help students truly understand the conflict. This cartoon is no exception.

Published in 1947 in the wake of Soviet involvement in Greece and Turkey, Jay “Ding” Darling captures the feelings of the hopelessness ahead in resolving issues with communist Russia.

We have included questions and answers for your classroom use.

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Israeli Declaration of Independence, 1948

After WWII ended, the new nation of Israel was announced by their Declaration of Independence.

They hoped for UN recognition and peace with surrounding nations.

We have included a copy of the Declaration as well as questions and answers.

This might be an interesting comparison with other historical declarations.

For more on this era check out our PowerPoint resources:

U.S. Foreign Policy in the Cold War Era: Truman to Kennedy

The Modern Era: 1945-1970

The beginning of the Cold War

This cartoon, drawn by Bruce Russell in 1945, is an excellent example of the symbols and concepts used throughout the Cold War.

What is so interesting about it is that it was drawn in 1945, at the beginning of the decades long conflict.

We have included a copy of the cartoon with questions and answers for your classroom.

For more on this era check out our resources:

US History PowerPoints

World History PowerPoints

Simulation games

J. Edgar Hoover’s Congressional Testimony

J. Edgar Hoover was the head of the FBI from its inception in 1935 through 1972.

Many of those years were dedicated to rooting out communists in America.

In this testimony before Congress in 1947 Hoover outlines the dangers facing the US during the Cold War.

We have included a copy of the testimony as well as questions and answers.

For more on this era check out our PowerPoints:

US History

World History

The Modern Era: 1945-1970

Simulation games:

Technology has made the world smaller, 1946

This film explores the beginnings of transportation and communication across the oceans and lands.

It explains some of the key technologies, including steam power, gasoline engines, telephones, and the newest one, television that “brings all parts if the earth as close together as out living room.”

Although it is a bit cheesy, it could generate some great discussion on the experiences students have everyday of faraway places. Brainstorm what products are located in the classroom that are a result of the technologies listed in the film.

As an extension, ask students to add another five minutes to the film in order to include some of the newer technologies that did not exist in the 1940s. Group students and have them write the narrative for the announcer as well as choosing the images and technologies that best depict the global village called earth.

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