1912 Exam for 8th graders


Exam part1

This exam was given to 8th grade students in Bullitt County, Kentucky.

A rural community, it was a big deal to make it as far as 8th grade and some students who scored well were granted scholarships to high school.

This would be a fun exam to pass out to students in any grade as a beginning of the year assignment, either individually or in small groups to see collectively how many they might be able to answer. Obviously some of the questions are no longer relevant nor will they be able to answer all of them, but this can be a great springboard for class discussions and as an ice breaker.

Here is the exam in a format ready for your classroom use.

For a link to the answers head here: Bullitt County exam answers

History and Functions of the Presidency

History and Functions of the Presidency_000090

Click here to check out this educational film on the Presidency. Not super exciting, but it gets to the point.

For more resources on teaching American Government, check out our PowerPoints:

Betty Boop for President

This adorable 1932 video depicts Betty Boop running for president against “Mr. Nobody”.

The two candidates sing their campaign promises, which provides much fodder for class discussions on elections.

There is even a scene showing the two parties in Congress disagreeing about each issue raised.

The only cautionary moment is at about the 3 minute mark when the Republican elephant calls the Democratic donkey an “ass”. Depending on the maturity of your class this may not be appropriate, unless it discussed beforehand to place it in context.

For more resources on teaching about the 1930s check out our The Great Depression and the New Deal PowerPoint.

For more resources on teaching government check out our PowerPoints:

Nixon’s resignation letter

The Watergate scandal rocked the U.S. and resulted in the resignation of President Nixon.

We have included a copy of the letter submitted to Secretary of State Kissinger in August of 1974.

For more information on this era check out our PowerPoints:

Classroom history games:

Appeasement cartoon by Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss was an American treasure for all of his amazing contributions throughout his prolific life.

His political cartoons during WWII provide a wonderful opportunity for students to analyze obvious images in order to decipher the messages.

We have included a copy of this cartoon along with questions and answers.

For more WWII resources check out our:

1940s Historic Film Collection

US History PowerPoints:

World History PowerPoints:

Classroom History Classroom Games

Peace Corps

President Kennedy created the Peace Corps with Executive Order 10924 in March 1961.

We have included a copy of the Order along with questions and answers.

For more on this era check out:

US History PowerPoints – 

1960s

US Foreign Policy in the Cold War Era: Truman to Kennedy

Classroom History games -

Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

The controversial Fugitive Slave Act in 1850 was one of several compromises made during the tenuous antebellum period.

The cartoon we have chosen to highlight today works great for students as it requires them to analyze both the images and text in order to gain a deeper understanding of the artist’s position.

We have included a copy of the cartoon as well as questions and answers.

For more US History resources on this era check out our PowerPoints:

Classroom History games:

Cuban Missile Crisis political cartoon

This cartoon, drawn by Edmund Valtman and published in The Hartford Times, October 30, 1962, is a fantastic cartoon for classroom use.

The symbols used are easily recognizable and that makes students feel much more confident going into a cartoon interpretative assignment.

We have included a copy of the cartoon as well as questions and answers ready to use in your classroom.

For more Cold War resources check out our PowerPoints:

US History

World History

Classroom History Games:

Lincoln’s message to the Senate, 1861

The Civil War is rich with primary source materials ranging from photographs to speeches to letters and much more. What a great opportunity for students to experience firsthand the depths of despair people felt at having a war within the nation.

President Lincoln hoped to end the conflict without bloodshed, but when it became obvious that was impossible he wanted to expedite the process as much as possible.

At the time of this speech, on July 5, 1861 several states had seceded and the attack on Fort Sumter had already occurred.

This speech is Lincoln appealing to the first session of the 37th Congress to take action in order to end the war quickly. We have included a page from the Journal of the Senate as well as questions and answers.

For more resources on teaching this era check out our PowerPoints:

Classroom history games:

Origin of Memorial Day

This article from The Jasper News was published May 29, 1919.

It gives a detailed background of the origins of the holiday.

For a PDF version that is larger and ready for printing or blowing up on a LCD for students to read click here.

Need more resources for teaching history?  Check out MML’s catalog.

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