The First Hundred Days under FDR

This fantastic cartoon from 1933 allows for deep analysis by students.

The cartoonist depicts FDR as TR, attacking the nation’s problems with “The Big Stick”.

We have included a copy of the cartoon with questions and answers.

So many concepts at work here, this could spark an amazing classroom discussion!

For more resources on this era check out our 1930s PowerPoint, as well as our FDR and the New Deal simulation game.

Executive Order 9981

President Truman ended segregation in the armed services in 1948 with Executive Order 9981.

This historic document is easy for students to decipher and a valuable look at a primary source document.

We have included a copy of the EO as well as questions and answers.

For more on this era see our Civil Rights Movement PowerPoint.

President Grant, Congress, and the Fifteenth Amendment

President Grant sent a telegram to Congress in March of 1870 announcing the ratification of the 15th amendment, an action he acknowledged was breaking protocol.

He wanted to emphasize the importance of the amendment, as he believed it to be the single greatest action taken since the founding of the nation.

We have included a copy of the telegram, as well questions and answers for students.

For more on this era check out our Reconstruction PowerPoint.

Monroe Doctrine cartoons lesson

monroe doctrine

The Monroe Doctrine is arguably one of the top ten most influential policies ever penned by a president. It helped define the stance the U.S. would take in the affairs of foreign nations, at first in the Western Hemisphere, and later the world.

Teaching with cartoons is such a powerful manner of introducing high level concepts. It also tends to grab the attention of all students, since most of us understand symbols pretty easily.

Here are two cartoons along with questions and answers on the Monroe Doctrine.

President Eisenhower’s Farewell Address, 1961

Eisenhower's farewell speech

As a Westpoint graduate, army officer, WWII general, NATO Supreme Commander, and president during the Korean Conflict, Eisenhower was well versed in the military strength of the nation over the course of decades and in various situations.

It might be surprising then to learn that in his farewell address he believed that disarmament ought to be a goal for the nation and world at large. He feared a military industrial complex might overpower the nation, since it was the first time in US history that a permanent armament industry existed.

We have included in this post a link to the speech in its entirety as well as a copy of the transcript with questions and answers for students.

Please view our 1950s PowerPoint if you would like a complete exploration of the decade.